CINCO CINCO HOUSE


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CONSTRUCTION

HERNÁNDEZ SILVA AR. ASOC.
AR. JORGE LUIS HERNANDEZ SILVA
ENGR. HÉCTOR MENDOZA MEJÍA

COLLABORATORS

AR. GERARDO GÓMEZ
AR. MARISELA ALVARADO
AR. CARLOS MÁRQUEZ CODINA

LOCATION

TLAJOMULCO DE ZÚÑIGA, JALISCO, MÉXICO

PROJECT YEAR

2001


CONSTRUCTION YEAR

2001-2003

AREA

1400 m2

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

TADE (TEC. AVANZADA EN CÁLCULO ESTRUCTURAL)
ENGR. ÁLVARO VALLEJO

PHOTOGRAPHY

MITO COVARRUBIAS

The house is located in an uneven ground, the access road to it is very steep; the land descends between rocks and trees about 12 meters and is located about 200 meters above the city. The view of Guadalajara and its surroundings is stunning, it contains an ever changing horizon; in day time a serene landscape is witnessed and at night a dramatic view above de lights of the valley. 

When developing the architectural program and carefully analyzing the user and its needs for social and private life, as well as its variable peculiarities, it was concluded which spaces the house would have, which would always be very generous and enlightened. 

The house works its concept using the site and the user as main elements; it merges them into a single body integrated by different volumes, it proposes an \"L\" scheme that embraces the landscape, this is fragmented horizontally by blind volumes on its base to fully transparent at the top. This allowed us to develop a highly functional concept suitable to the site, where the access through the top was required and allowing us to place the day living spaces at the upper and transparent fractions, and more intimate towards the bottom, achieving more privacy.

Transparency was considered as one of the most important values ​​to develop the project; the house has a fence towards the street that limits the inside so subtle that it looks more like a cover of an ethereal material than a separation from the exterior. The windows are always clear and generous, so that the outside blends with the inside as a single composition element, the walls are always fragmented by transparent bodies and levitating on its base. This transparency is brought to its tectonic formation, for us it was essential that all structural elements: columns, beams and slabs, as well as architectural elements: roofs, walls and windows, were clearly shown both to the exterior and the interior. 

The community asked for inclined roofs, therefore, we decided to emphasize them to top of the house with a homogeneous, light and harshly outlined cover, which generates an expressive effect that wraps different spaces.

The slope of the street allowed us to make two different accesses: cars and pedestrian at different levels which are structured one over another. The pedestrian on the upper part, linked to the social areas of the house and the car entrance directly to the private areas. 

The house is divided into four levels; the first one is a platform where the terrace, the family kitchen and bathroom area are located, this level passes flush from the ground being more attached to it and with a view over the large garden and bordering trees. The second level contains the garage, service and rooms. The master bedroom is a great element that is embedded on the landscape, topped by a glass platform that is floating over the empty space, made of a lightweight and almost invisible railing structure. The glass on the floor was given opacity to eliminate the vertigo sensation. The third level, the most transparent one, contains all social areas: dining room, kitchen, living room, study and game area at the end of a large terrace directly linking the platform to the horizon. This floor was built with slender cylindrical columns that rise above the concrete slab as needles to reach the deck cover assembled in plywood, as if separated the space more than hold it. The top floor is occupied by the oratory and collections room, linking the two slopes of the roof. 

Textures are mostly worked by the same materials that make the structure: concrete, bush-hammered cement, steel structures. Only some stone walls were coated with materials such as seashells, stone or large dimensions marble. The roof is covered with ceramic matching the seashells same color, made expressly for the house.